because BACON.

always forward.

74 notes

kinoyoga:

B.K.S. Iyengar was a contemporary of my teacher Sri K. Pattabhi Jois and both had the same Guru, Sri T. Krishnamacharya. What these three teachers did for the world of yoga is enough to fill a thousand lifetimes of service. There is no eulogy that can embody the monumental change brought about in the lives of the multitudes of people who practice yoga because of their hard work and dedication to this spiritual path. I am filled with an apprehensive sense of sadness by Iyengar’s passing because his death somehow for me marks the end of an era of teachers connected to India’s historic past. Perhaps I am being melodramatic but it seems to me to be the final passing of the torch to our current generation and that now we bear the responsibility to tend to the sacred knowledge of the true self contained within the yoga tradition. How much knowledge has already been lost by our distracted minds, how can we in our all imperfection be the bearers of these precious truths, how can we carry the light of yoga in our hearts and lives with honor and integrity. While I think it’s amazing that yoga is reaching so many people in so many new and different ways Iyengar’s passing makes it only more evident to me how crucial it is that we, the teachers and students of yoga, have a responsibility to honor the dedication of our teachers before us and embody not just the asanas, but the true essence of yoga, the inner tradition. It is the introspective work of each individual student that honors this tradition—we must be strong enough to carry this message forward in the world. It is the yogi’s journey to the center of the self through the tool of asana that unlocks the limitless potential of the human spirit. In Iyengar’s words, “The practice of yogasana for the sake of health, to keep fit, or to maintain flexibility is the external practice of yoga. While this is a legitimate place to begin, it is not the end… Even in simple asanas, one is experiencing the three levels of quest: the external quest, which brings firmness of the body; the internal quest, which brings steadiness of intelligence; and the innermost quest, which brings benevolence of spirit.”  Photo by @tiagophotofilm

kinoyoga:

B.K.S. Iyengar was a contemporary of my teacher Sri K. Pattabhi Jois and both had the same Guru, Sri T. Krishnamacharya. What these three teachers did for the world of yoga is enough to fill a thousand lifetimes of service. There is no eulogy that can embody the monumental change brought about in the lives of the multitudes of people who practice yoga because of their hard work and dedication to this spiritual path. I am filled with an apprehensive sense of sadness by Iyengar’s passing because his death somehow for me marks the end of an era of teachers connected to India’s historic past. Perhaps I am being melodramatic but it seems to me to be the final passing of the torch to our current generation and that now we bear the responsibility to tend to the sacred knowledge of the true self contained within the yoga tradition. How much knowledge has already been lost by our distracted minds, how can we in our all imperfection be the bearers of these precious truths, how can we carry the light of yoga in our hearts and lives with honor and integrity. While I think it’s amazing that yoga is reaching so many people in so many new and different ways Iyengar’s passing makes it only more evident to me how crucial it is that we, the teachers and students of yoga, have a responsibility to honor the dedication of our teachers before us and embody not just the asanas, but the true essence of yoga, the inner tradition. It is the introspective work of each individual student that honors this tradition—we must be strong enough to carry this message forward in the world. It is the yogi’s journey to the center of the self through the tool of asana that unlocks the limitless potential of the human spirit. In Iyengar’s words, “The practice of yogasana for the sake of health, to keep fit, or to maintain flexibility is the external practice of yoga. While this is a legitimate place to begin, it is not the end… Even in simple asanas, one is experiencing the three levels of quest: the external quest, which brings firmness of the body; the internal quest, which brings steadiness of intelligence; and the innermost quest, which brings benevolence of spirit.”
Photo by @tiagophotofilm

(via yogi-moni)